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Steps following an on-the-job injury in New York

New Yorkers take pride in their work. They show up and get the job done. But between showing up and getting the job done, accidents can happen. Machines break, materials falter people make mistakes. When the worst happens, New Yorkers get hurt, or even killed. New Yorkers who suffer a construction injury should take the following steps.

First, get treatment. Once the emergency has passed, get looked at by a health-care provider approved by the Workers' Compensation Board. In some cases, a New Yorker's employer or workers' compensation insurance carrier may require further tests by a designated provider. This requirement must be given in writing.

Second, notify the company of the injury and how it occurred. Do so as soon as possible. Procrastinating can cost someone their claim because workers' compensation law requires injured employees to give their employer written notice no later than 30 days after the accident that caused the injury. More time is given in cases involving an occupational disease. In those cases, workers must notify their company within either two years of the disablement or two years after the worker knew or should have known that the disease came from work.

Third, fill out the paperwork (Form C-3). And then mail it to the closest Workers' Compensation Board.

After that, keep getting treatment, get an independent medical examination and attend any case hearings that take place.

But while following these steps may sound straightforward, completing them in practice can be much more difficult. To make sure the claim gets filed correctly and on time, New Yorkers may benefit from discussing their case with an attorney that has experience with construction-related injury.

Source: New York State Workers' Compensation Board, "What To Do If You Are Injured On The Job," Accessed Dec. 30, 2014

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